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Driving UK: How many points do you get for speeding? Your top questions answered

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Watch your speed! (Picture: Getty)

Being aware of your speed is crucially important for both your safety on the road and others around you.

But sometimes even the very best drivers among us get caught speeding, whether they meant to go over the speed limit or not.

If you’ve ended up with a speeding ticket, you likely have many questions about what happens next.

Personal and commercial vehicle leasing company, Vanarama, recently looked into the answers behind some of the top questions people ask around the topic of speeding.

Every driver should always be cautious and aware of the speed limits, but if you do ever get caught speeding, here is some information about what to expect…

How many points do I get for speeding?

It is very important to be aware of the speed limits wherever you are driving (Picture: Getty)

The number of points you receive for speeding all depends on how fast you were driving over the speed limit.

There are three bands you can fall into depending on how fast you were going.

Band A

  • Driving between 21-30mph in a 20mph zone: three points
  • Driving between 31-40mph in a 30mph zone: three points
  • Driving between 41-55mph in a 40mph zone: three points
  • Driving between 51-65mph in a 50mph zone: three points
  • Driving between 61-80mph in a 60mph zone: three points
  • Driving between 71-90mph in a 70mph zone: three points

Band B

  • Driving between 31-41mph in a 20mph zone: Disqualified for seven to 28 days or four to six points
  • Driving between 41-50mph in a 30mph zone: Disqualified for seven to 28 days or four to six points
  • Driving between 56-65mph in a 40mph zone: Disqualified for seven to 28 days or four to six points
  • Driving between 66-75mph in a 50mph zone: Disqualified for seven to 28 days or four to six points
  • Driving between 81-90mph in a 60mph zone: Disqualified for seven to 28 days or four to six points
  • Driving between 91-100mph in a 70mph zone: Disqualified for seven to 28 days or four to six points

Band C

  • Driving at 41mph and above in a 20mph zone: Disqualified for seven to 56 days or six points
  • Driving at 51mph and above in a 30mph zone: Disqualified for seven to 56 days or six points
  • Driving at 66mph and above in a 40mph zone: Disqualified for seven to 56 days or six points
  • Driving at 76mph and above in a 50mph zone: Disqualified for seven to 56 days or six points
  • Driving at 91mph and above in a 60mph zone: Disqualified for seven to 56 days or six points
  • Driving at 101mph and above in a 70mph zone: Disqualified for seven to 56 days or six points

How much is a speeding fine?

The amount of points you receive on your licence depends on how much over the speed limit you were going (Picture: Getty)

The amount of your speeding fine is also determined by how fast you were going and what band you fall into from above.

The fine is then worked out based on your weekly income.

Here is how much you are likely to be fined depending on what speeding band you are placed in:

  • Band A: Ranges between 25-75% of weekly income
  • Band B: Ranges between 75-125% of weekly income
  • Band C: Ranges between 125-175% of weekly income

Although speeding fines are based on your income, there are also set limits in place.

The minimum amount you will be fined is £100, while the maximum amount is £1,000 in the UK.

However, if you were speeding on a motorway the maximum fine increases to £2,500.

How long does a speeding ticket take to arrive?

If you have been caught speeding you should expect to receive two notices within 14 days of you being caught.

The two notices will include:

  • Notice of Intended Prosecution (NIP)
  • Section 172 Notice

When the NIP arrives, you must complete Section 172 confirming who was driving at the time of the incident, even if that person was not you but another registered driver.

Traffic police often use mobile speed cameras (Picture: Getty)

You must return this to the police within 28 days.

You will then receive a conditional offer of a Fixed Penalty Notice (FPN) from the police, which may give you the option of taking a speed awareness course to prevent points being added to your driving licence or a letter telling you to go to court.

The law states that the police must send the NIP within 14 days of the offence, not including the day it happened.

The NIP you receive must be dated within 14 days of the offence – if it is dated outside of this time, the notice is invalid.

However, it can arrive after the 14-day period as long as it is dated and sent out during that time. 

What is the national speed limit?

The national speed limit sign is a white circle with a diagonal black line running through it (Picture: Getty)

The national speed limit is a maximum of 30mph in built-up areas, 60mph on a single carriageway, and 70mph on dual carriageways.

The national speed limit road sign has a diagonal black rectangle intersecting a white circle from the top right to bottom left – this signifies where the national speed limit begins.

Local councils can set their own speed limits in certain areas, and these must be clearly signed.

For more information on speed limits and how they pertain to different vehicles, head to gov.uk.

Keep your eye on the speed limit, wherever you’re driving (Picture: Getty)

Is speeding a criminal offence?

If you pay your fine on time, speeding will not be dealt with as a criminal offence.

You have to pay the fixed penalty within 28 days – if you do so, no conviction will be recorded against you.

Will speeding at over 100mph get you an instant driving ban?

Driving over 100mph will result in you being seriously penalised.

You will likely be banned from driving following a court appearance, with disqualification typically being the punishment for such excessive speeding.

The final decision will be at the discretion of the court, meaning it could be possible to avoid disqualification, but it is highly unlikely.

How long do points stay on your licence?

Most points stay on your licence for four years from the date of the offence, although they are only active for the first three.

For more serious offences, such as causing death or injury by dangerous driving or drink driving, the points will stay on your licence for 11 years.

Some speed cameras flash when they take a picture (Picture: Getty)

How do speed cameras work?

Speed cameras record a vehicle’s speed by using detectors either in the road or with radar technology, depending on whether it is a fixed or mobile camera.

If a camera detects speeding, it will take a digital image to capture the vehicle’s colour, type, make, registration plate, and sometimes the face of the driver depending on the placement of the camera.

If it is a fixed-speed camera, it will more than likely flash, while mobile cameras will not.

The most common fixed speed cameras are called Gatso and Truvelo – Gatso are square and do flash, while Truvelo are circular and don’t flash.

There is no way to check whether or not you’ve been caught speeding. If you see a camera flash, you can likely expect a letter within the next 14 days.

MORE: Self-driving cars will be allowed on UK motorways later this year

MORE: Driving lessons and tests to resume in England and Wales

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